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Market Your Book

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While working on your book this summer, take some time to learn a few techniques about online book marketing. Don’t worry, we can help you with the details through our sister company, Stonebrook Publishing, but as an aspiring writer, it’s always helpful to have an idea of things work. After all, your book probably will not reach many people if you don’t learn how to market a book online. Take a look at these ideas and helpful tips to get your book in front of more people!

Meet Amy Porterfield

Amy produces a weekly Podcast, Online Marketing Made Easy, which is full of great information and easy-to-implement advice that can help you successfully market your book on Facebook. If you think Facebook ads are a waste of time and money, I guarantee, Amy can change your mind!

Before you completely write her off because you don’t think you have time for Podcasts, hear me out. I used to avoid Podcasts because I didn’t believe I had the time to sit down and dedicate my attention to a full Podcast. Then I realized how much “dead time” I have throughout the day when I am in the car, getting ready in the morning, cooking, cleaning, etc. These are all perfect times for putting on a Podcast and getting some great information. I now listen to so many Podcasts in my car that I call in my “Auto University.”

Not only is Amy herself a wealth of information, she also uses her Podcast to introduce you to other online marketers and their Podcasts. All of these marketing gurus can teach you so much, all while you multitask in the car, in the kitchen, or anywhere you can tune into an episode.

Here are a few of my favorite online marketing Podcasts:

Let David Siteman Garland show you how to create online courses

If you feel like you have valuable information to share, but aren’t sure how to get it out into the world, David can help you. He offers a step-by-step proven system for creating, promoting, and then profiting from your own online course. His free video series: How to turn your ONLINE PLATFORM (blog, web show, Podcast, etc. (into REVENUE by creating your own ONLINE COURSE, can be found right here. Follow his advice and you’ll be turning a profit in no time.

Learn about mobile marketing from Greg Hickman

Anyone who has a smartphone of his or her own knows that mobile marketing is essential. Greg can help you incorporate mobile marketing strategies for your retail business and show you how to be successful with that marketing. He’s all about making use of his extensive network of marketing expert friends to help you dominate mobile. Greg’s web show gives you access to free, uncensored interviews with some of the world’s top experts and most successful mobile marketers. Listen in and take advantage of their experience, insight, and expert advice about how to help retailers and marketers completely dominate mobile marketing.

Figure out how to outsource your online marketing with help from Chris Ducker

If you consider your book a business, the New Business Podcast is for you. This weekly show introduces you to top minds within the “new business” realm. You’ll hear discussions about everything from branding, strategy, business growth, and much more. Chris is known as “The VA Guy” (VA, as in Virtual Assistant) so when it comes to the world of outsourcing, he really knows his stuff.

Create a successful Podcast with John Lee Dumas

Ready to strike out on your own and create your very own Podcast? John Lee Dumas, the founder, and host of EntrpreneurOnFire, can help. This award-winning Podcast covers the inspiring journeys of successful entrepreneurs, every day of the week. This Podcast generates over $250,000 a month in revenue, which in itself is a pretty solid argument for you taking the free 15-day course on Podcasting.

Get to know social media marketing with Michael Stelzner

If you are looking for a Social Media marketing guriu Michael is your guy. His on-demand talk radio show, Social Media Marketing Podcast is designed to help business owners and marketers figure out what works and what doesn’t when it comes to social media marketing.

What about you? Are you ready to take your book to the next level and get it in front of the right people? Contact us today and we can help you take the next step!


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Can You Make Money Writing a Book?

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It’s May—finally! They say that April showers bring May flowers. I’m not sure about you, but I”m ready to see some flowers in bloom! You know what else reminds me of flowers blooming? Writing a book. Let me explain. As an international book coach, I’m often asked whether or not you can make money writing a book. The short answer to this question is yes, but you must be willing to do the work. Writing a book is the first step, getting others to read and purchase it is the next. When you plant your seed by writing a book and then shower it by getting it in front of the right audience, you can sit back and watch your garden bloom! And you don’t have to be a mathematician to know that more purchases equal more money in your pocket!

The process of promoting your book starts well before you’ve published it. Building a network of interested and supportive followers is a process that should start while you’re writing your book, and it should continue as long as you want to sell your books. Your friends, family, and colleagues will be a rallying point to keep you motivated as you go, and they will also be rooting for your success all along. They will celebrate as you launch your book, and their enthusiasm, likes, and shares on social media will help you to reach their friends and family as well.

Keep reading to learn about six experts who have created expert marketing resources in the form of websites, social media posts, and podcasts, who can help you begin to master digital marketing and get your book in front of the right people!

Social media made easy for authors.

Amy Porterfield produces a weekly Podcast, Online Marketing Made Easy, which is full of great information and easy-to-implement advice that can help you successfully market your book on Facebook. If you think Facebook ads are a waste of time and money, I guarantee, Amy can change your mind!

Before you completely write her off because you don’t think you have time for Podcasts, hear me out. I used to avoid Podcasts because I didn’t believe I had the time to sit down and listen to a full Podcast. Then I realized how much “dead time” I had throughout the day when I am in the car, getting ready in the morning, cooking, cleaning, etc. These are all perfect times for listening to a Podcast and getting some great information. I now listen to so many Podcasts in my car that I call in my “Auto University.”

Not only is Amy herself a wealth of information, she also uses her Podcast to introduce you to other online marketers and their Podcasts. All of these marketing gurus can teach you so much, all while you multitask in the car, in the kitchen, or anywhere you can tune into an episode.

Here are a few of my favorite online marketing Podcasts:

Create online courses to supplement your book.

If you feel like you have valuable information to share, and want to take it a level beyond your business book, David Siteman Garland can help you develop an online course to complement or supplement your book. He offers a step-by-step proven system for creating, promoting, and then profiting from your own online course. His free video series: How to turn your ONLINE PLATFORM (blog, web show, Podcast, etc. (into REVENUE by creating your own ONLINE COURSE, can be found right here. Follow his advice and you’ll be turning a profit in no time.

Powerful mobile marketing expertise.

Anyone who has a smartphone of his or her own knows that mobile marketing is essential. Greg Hickman can help you incorporate mobile marketing strategies for your retail business and show you how to be successful with that marketing, an example of this can be seen through digital retailer marketing services similar to woocommerce SEO. He’s all about making use of his extensive network of marketing expert friends to help you dominate mobile. Greg’s web show gives you access to free, uncensored interviews with some of the world’s top experts and most successful mobile marketers. Listen in and take advantage of their experience, insight, and expert advice about how to help retailers and marketers completely dominate mobile marketing.

Managing your book marketing and promotions with help.

If you consider your book a business, the New Business Podcast is for you. This weekly show introduces you to top minds within the “new business” realm. You’ll hear discussions about everything from branding, strategy, business growth, and much more. Chris Ducker is known as “The VA Guy” (VA, as in Virtual Assistant) so when it comes to the world of outsourcing, he really knows his stuff. If you are looking for even more ways to market your product, you might also want to reach out to a Digital Marketing Agency such as Ram Digital to help you develop an online strategy.

Create a successful podcast to promote your book.

Ready to strike out on your own and create your very own Podcast? John Lee Dumas, the founder and host of EntrpreneurOnFire, can help. This award-winning Podcast covers the inspiring journeys of successful entrepreneurs, every day of the week. This Podcast generates over $250,000 a month in revenue, which in itself is a pretty solid argument for you taking the free 15-day course on Podcasting.

Up-to-the-minute social and digital marketing expertise.

If you are looking for a Social Media marketing guru Michael Stelzner is your guy. His on-demand talk radio show, Social Media Marketing Podcast is designed to help business owners and marketers figure out what works and what doesn’t when it comes to social media marketing. If you’re looking to learn about a seo service for your website follow the link.

What about you? Are you ready to make money writing a book? Contact us today and we can help you take the first step!


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Your Audience: Write for the Right People

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As a writing coach, I help busy professionals write high-impact nonfiction books that save lives, change lives, or transform society. Part of that job includes making sure my clients are writing their book to the right people. Not everyone is your audience. One of the worst things a writer can do is write a book for the wrong audience. Not only will your message not be heard, but you’ll be frustrated with your book’s lack of success. If you’ve decided to write a book, make sure you’re writing for the right people.

Research First, Then Write

All too many authors write their book without defining the target audience, and defining your audience is particularly important when writing nonfiction. And yet, if you narrow in on something too niche, you might discover that your audience is simply too small. For example, you might write a riveting book about how to maintain antique farm equipment, but will enough people be interested in that topic? It’s possible, but you want to be confident that you have solid book marketing plans before you start to write. You must think about your target audience when planning your book, as well as throughout the writing process.

Here are some questions to ask yourself regarding your target audience:

  • How old are they?
  • What is their gender?
  • What’s their education level?
  • What concerns/problems do they have?
  • Do they live in one specific geographic area?
  • What shared interests will they have?

First-time authors, especially those who write memoirs or biographies, may think that their target audience is people like themselves, when in reality, your audience may be quite different from you. It’s important to identify what your audience actually wants and needs, not what you think they do.

Book Audience vs. Market

For example, if you’re writing a book for children, children are your audience, but they’re not your market. Your market is the person with the pocketbook—the parents.

Be specific when defining your primary market. Picture the person who will buy your book. Is it a woman between the ages of 30 and 50 who is unhappy with the signs of aging? A target audience of all women between the ages of 30 and 50 is too broad, so it’s important to consider what subset of that group you want to attract. Ask yourself what will draw them in. How do you hope to influence and/or interest these women?

It’s also important to consider secondary markets. Secondary markets are those are the people/organizations/institutions who will also purchase your book, like educators who might be writing or teaching about your topic, or mental health practitioners if you’re writing about a topic like depression. Think hard about all the different groups that might benefit from your book. Try to come up with at least six markets for your book—a primary market and five secondary markets. You’re going to use this information when you start reaching out to customers, so be thorough.

Define Your Goal

It’s important to know what you hope to accomplish with your book. You should know what message you want to send, and who that message is supposed to reach. Book marketing is about knowing who will benefit from your book, and then focusing your marketing efforts on that audience.

When it comes to marketing your book, choosing your target market and an audience is essential to your book’s success. Consider all the possibilities to ensure that a proper audience and market exist for your book, and then create your plan to grab their attention.

If you or someone you know is ready to write your book for the right audience, please contact us today. We can help you take the next step and market your book to the right people when it’s complete!


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Write More Than A Book With The Book Professor

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If you’ve been thinking about writing a book, you may feel hesitant because you don’t know how to get started. That’s no surprise. You can spend a lot of time spinning your wheels and burning precious hours if you don’t have a process to follow. But when you have a step-by-step method and follow it faithfully, you can systematically write a high-impact nonfiction book that will stand shoulder-to-shoulder with the best on the market AND have content that can be repurposed to deliver your message across a variety of channels.

You already know that everyone isn’t going to read a book, but does that mean they must miss your message? Your finished book can now become the launchpad through which you deliver your message in multiple venues. When you follow our methodology to construct your book in Chapter Silos, you can take those chapters and repurpose them for articles, workshops, seminars, keynotes, online courses, video training, podcasts, etc. That’s the extended value of this carefully constructed methodology!

The Whole Shebang

Through the combination of our three sister companies, The Book Professor®, Stonebrook Publishing, and Bookarma®, we offer authors a unique model in the world of publishing. We are a one-stop-shop for the entire book process. This includes the writing, editing, publishing, marketing, and repurposing your book material into additional revenue-producing products.

You bring us your nonfiction book manuscript, and along with supportive services from our sister companies, The Book Professor® and Bookarma®, we help you write your book, edit your manuscript, publish your book, and help you repurpose the content so you can develop additional revenue-producing products such as podcasts, seminars, workshops, blog articles, and online courses.

We strictly work with high-impact nonfiction material that will either save lives, change lives, or transform society. We are the only author support company that offers what we call “The Whole Shebang.”

Ready to write more than a book in a year with The Book Professor and repurpose your material for workshops, seminars, speeches and more? Contact us today and we can help you take the next step!


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The Book Professor-The One Stop Shop For Writing Your Book

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You’ve always wanted to write a book, but you haven’t been able to get that dream off of your bucket list. You know there’s something you can share with the world through your memoir, your leadership book, or your how-to guide, but you’re overwhelmed at the process and unsure of where to start.

That’s where I can help. I have spent more than 25 years developing my process for helping authors share what’s inside of them. Whether you have a manuscript in hand and need help with editing and marketing or if you don’t have anything written and aren’t sure where to start—we can help.

Three Options for Those Wanting To Write A Non-Fiction Book

  • Self-Study: Do you feel confident in your ability to dedicate the time and follow along with the material on your own? Maybe our Self-Directed Course is right for you. With weekly lessons and homework through the course, you receive a wealth of information and support all designed to help you complete your manuscript in less than one year. Click here for details.
  • Group Coaching Classes: Are you looking for the group support that comes with my group coaching? Consider the online group writer coaching option, which connects you with a group of writers to push and inspire you throughout the one-year process. Click here for details.
  • 1-on-1 Writer Coaching: If you’re looking for more in-depth help with writing and publishing, consider my 1-on-1 writer coaching. You’ll receive my one-on-one attention and support from concept to finished book. Plus, you’ll get it done faster than if you chose the Group Coaching classes. Click here for details.

 

Book Marketing Blues? We Got You

Frustrated with marketing your book yet? It’s never an overnight success, and the best approach is to implement a variety of strategies to get the word out. It takes a consistent effort to get the word out and drive traffic to book sales. And you can do it.

Why not add one or more new channels to your marketing efforts such as:

  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • LinkedIN
  • Amazon
  • Your author website
  • Book reviews
  • Further book publicity

Take a look at all the book marketing options you have when working with us.  Want to take it a step further? Are you Interested in more speaking opportunities, catalog sales and special distribution? Learn about our bulk sales options here.

Publishing and Editing

Publishing is an industry, and a very old one. There are standards and conventions—from the writing, to the interior design, to the book cover, to the choice of paper and cover stock that most lay people don’t notice or even understand. But others will judge you on the quality of your book, which makes self-publishing very risky. If you want to write and publish a book that reflects your professionalism, you must work with professionals.

At our sister company, Stonebrook Publishing, we walk you through the entire step-by-step process to produce a professional book product that’s a credit to your name and accepted by the market.

Not Ready To Write Yet?

Are you thinking about writing a book but not quite ready to sign up for our Get My Book Out course for writers? Do you want just a taste of the Book Professor’s book coaching or want to learn about a specific topic? Take advantage of these Small Bite Seminars that can get you started!

Choose one or select them all — they’re easily affordable at only $39 each! With topics like:

What You Need To Know Before You Write and Publish Your Book

10 Mistakes New Authors Make And How To Avoid Them

A Simple Formula For Telling Your Story

How To Attract The Right Audience For Your Book

How To Purpose, Plan, and Title Your Book

How To Manage Your Time To Finish Your Book

Chose one or choose them ALL and get one FREE!

Through the combination of our three sister companies, The Book Professor®, Stonebrook Publishing, and Bookarma®, we are a one-stop shop for the entire book process. This includes the writing, editing, designing, publishing, marketing, and repurposing your book material into additional revenue-producing products.   

If you or someone you know wants to learn how to write a nonfiction book, please contact us today and we will be happy to help you take the next step!


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How To Write A Book And Get It Published

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As  a book coach, I’m often asked the blanket question: “So how do I write a book and get it published?” Want to know the short answer? Make the decision. That’s really the first step. Once you’ve decided that you’re ready to write a book and get it published, following the guideline below will put you on the right track.

STEP ONE: WRITING AND WRITING AND WRITING

  • Initial Book Writing – The first step is to plan your book project in a BookMAP and write all the components until you have a finished manuscript. This is where you invest your time, energy, and emotion, and when you are finished you will have accomplished something few others have done! You will have a complete manuscript.
  • Editing Your Book – Every top-notch author has a first-class editor who does several things to improve upon what you have already accomplished. In the first pass, you will want a developmental editor. A developmental editor takes a look at your overall work and gives feedback on the structure and organization of the manuscript, the development of your characters, the consistency in your story line, your vocabulary, the impact of your message, your use of language and how your unique voice can be amplified. A developmental editor will point out any missing elements in your manuscript and make suggestions about how to weave them in. A developmental editor is crucial for every author, particularly if you are not a professional writer
  • Book Focus Groups – I’m a big believer in focus groups, and the best way to understand if your manuscript achieves its goal is to gather a group of six to ten people who are part of your target market, give them a copy of your manuscript, and ask for their raw feedback. This will be invaluable to you. When you receive that feedback, you make the changes you think are appropriate, then pass the manuscript to your editor for final editing.
  • Final Editing Process – This time, you need what we call line-level editing. You editor will scrub your work and make corrections in punctuation, verb tense, spelling, and sentence structure. They will correct your grammar and make suggestions about how to rewrite your sentences for clarity.
  • Proofreading – If you want a flawless manuscript, you can’t skip the step of hiring a proofreader. Understand this: You are not a capable proofreader. You already know what your story is supposed to say, and your brain will fill in any gaps with what you intended.

Once these steps are complete, you are ready to turn your manuscript into a book.

STEP TWO: THE BOOK DESIGN

Before you design your book, you need to know what you want to produce, and you have a lot of choices to make. Do you want a hardcover book? Or a softcover? Both come in a myriad of sizes, and you need to decide which size best fits your format. Will you issue an eBook, and if so, you need to prepare separate digital files for Kindle, Nook, and iPad.  

One of the most important elements is your book cover design. Your title and your book cover art will work together to invite the reader to purchase the book. They also work together to communicate the essence of your book, while creating a key question in the potential reader’s mind: What is this book about?

Remember that books are often shelved with only the spine visible, and you will want yours to stand out. What will the spine of your book look like? Try adding a dash of color to draw attention.

When turning your attention to the interior design, consider these questions: What fonts are you going to use? What will your copyright page look like? Your table of contents? You must use industry standards for chapter starts and page numbering. And be sure you’ve calculated the appropriate thumb holds – that’s the margin space where a reader places their thumbs to hold the book. Readers should not have to shift their thumbs while reading the book because this causes a degree of stress that interferes with their reading experience and causes fatigue.

Just for fun, take a look at some book interiors, and notice how they differ in style to match the book content. You need a professional designer for both the book cover an interior.

STEP THREE: BOOK PRODUCTION

Of course, you’ll need to get your book produced, and you have several options. Do you want to use an on-demand printer that will print the books as they are ordered?  There’s a higher cost per book for this option, but you won’t have to put your money into the inventory up front. However, if you want to pay the lowest possible amount per book, you will opt to print a large quantity of books and warehouse them until they are sold. The warehouse can be your basement, and many authors like this option because they can maximize their profits with this approach.

STEP FOUR: BOOK DISTRIBUTION

So now you’ve got the book in hand. How are you going to distribute it?

There are numerous ways to distribute your book and, of course, your eBooks will be distributed online.

If you print a number of books, you can elect to ship them out yourself as they are purchased, but bear in mind that this option requires you to have shipping supplies and a fair amount of time to send things out. Some people make arrangements with warehouse distributors or sheltered workshops to send out their books, and others elect to work through book distributors who receive orders and ship them out to bookstores, online retailers, and libraries. All your distributions methods require payment, so find out what the distributor requires before signing any contracts.

STEP FIVE: BOOK MARKETING

Books don’t sell themselves, so you need to plan your marketing strategy. Will you engage the services of a publicist? Or will you do what many authors do and use the social media tools that are so readily available? Will you hold events, like book readings? Use email marketing to get the word out? Or go the traditional advertising route?

Be specific when defining your primary market. Picture the person who buys your book. Is it a woman between the ages of 30 and 50 who is unhappy with the signs of aging? It isn’t every woman between 30 and 50, it’s a subset of that group. Who are they?

What are your secondary markets? Secondary markets are those people/organizations/institutions who will also purchase your book, like educators (if you’re writing about children) or mental health practitioners if you are writing about coming out of a depression. You’re going to use this information when you start reaching out to customers, so think it through.  

THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF WRITING & PUBLISHING YOUR BOOK

So what’s the most important part of this process? The most important part is always what you are working on right now. Focus on today. Don’t get ahead of yourself. Just do the best possible job on what’s in front of you. There will be plenty of time to focus on what’s ahead.

If you need help to write your book, consider one of my nonfiction book coaching programs:

 

 


author-coaching-book-coach-online-writing-class-get-my-book-outAbout Nonfiction Book Writing & Publishing Expert Nancy Erickson

Nancy Erickson is better known as “The Book Professor,” a writing and publishing consultant who specializes in helping aspiring nonfiction authors bring their book ideas to market. Nancy works as a book coach assisting authors that write self-help books, biographies, business books, and other nonfiction books through online courses and book coaching. Contact Nancy with questions or to have her speak at your upcoming event by clicking here.


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Your Online Reputation And Author Brand

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This article was originally guest posted to BookBaby by Caroline Black

Your online reputation can be your most powerful marketing tool and beacon for your author brand, as long as it’s properly monitored.

Once upon a time, authors could hide behind the pages of their books with no one knowing much about them aside from the name on the front cover. We now live in a very different age.

Many readers want to know as much about the person writing the story as they do about the content. For better or worse, the Internet has provided a platform for exploration that makes it easy for fans to delve into your background, and if you aren’t properly vetting what a Google search of your name brings up, it could lead to disaster for your career. One way to take control of this is to get a RepCheckup account.

Representing your author brand

Representing your author brand covers more than just going on book tours and signings. A plethora of online platforms can be harnessed by authors as promotional tools. However, sloppy practices when producing websites, working on social media, or messaging your mailing list could cause more harm than good.

If a prospective new reader, or even a long-term fan, doesn’t like the way you present yourself online, it’s highly likely she won’t pick up another copy of your work ever again. The author brand you chose to promote is up to you, but there are questions every author should ask when considering his or her online reputation.

1. Are you marketable?

Even though the product you’re looking to sell is yourself – or at least your talents as a writer – it’s still important to consider the marketability factor of the personality you’re promoting. To begin with, it’s essential to have a comprehensive grasp of yourself as a writer; consider what themes, ideas or message you’re trying to portray with your work and what emotional response you’re trying to elicit.

After this has been established, it’s time to check whether your online reputation reflects these ideals. Consider colors, graphics and font type when setting up webpages, and be stringent about the wording and emotional weight of the things you post.

2. Are you authentic?

There’s no rule stating your online reputation has to be a positive one; plenty of public figures have found notoriety through controversy and scandal. However, if you are endeavoring to be a provocative online figure, it is important to ensure that your author brand has been properly planned and considered.

It might seem fun to play the femme fatale or outspoken critic on the Internet, but if that sort of personality is far detached from who you are, then it’s only going to be a matter of time before your readership sees through this. “Fake†is a buzzword that pops up regularly on the Internet, usually inspiring a cutthroat response.

While your online presence as an author may be more carefully fabricated than your personal social media profiles, you’re still trying to present an authentic front. Audiences want to know who you are, not who you are pretending to be.

3. Are you engaging?

It’s not enough to post a single tweet or only update your website around the time of your book release or other significant event. The key to growing a fan base is to provide regular, engaging online content. This is why so many writers have set up personal blogs.

Writing relevant posts about topics related to your work or your goal as an author means your name and face are potentially popping up in the feeds of your fans and new readers. Staying active in this way also does a lot to increase your Google ranking. Both of these things are essential to a good online reputation and continued success in your career.

Look into Google Adwords or other SEO strategies in order to better structure your blog posts to attract more traffic.

4. Are you trustworthy?

For anyone who religiously uses the Internet, there’s a constant balance of trust and risk. You’re sharing your personal information with people you don’t actually know, so, by default, a presumed level of faith between you and those you are interacting with has to be established. However, this is fickle and can easily be broken.

There are many harmless hacks that are common for regular users of social media and blogging platforms. Most often, they manifest as spam links sent without your knowledge to your followers. Although they pose no real threat, many Internet users will avoid an infected domain once they’ve seen a problem.

There are lots of simple strategies to overcome this – password management, use of secure networks, etc. – but by far the best solution is the use of a Virtual Private Network (VPN). Using a VPN that you can find on a website like CompareMyVPN can give you an unprecedented level of online security. As one of the leading security programs on the market, a VPN encrypts all of your data and makes it very difficult for hackers or malware to gain access to your accounts. Secure Thoughts provides reviews of some of the best options on the market for those who want more information.

Your online reputation can be your most powerful marketing tool and beacon for your author brand, as long as it’s properly monitored. Ensuring you always have the questions outlined above in mind when setting up online accounts means you are positioned to get the biggest promotional benefit.

If you’ve had any insights related to an online reputation you’d like to share, be sure to leave a comment below. We’d love to hear your ideas!

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About BookBaby

Based in the Philadelphia-area, BookBaby is a team of authors, poets, bloggers, and artists — so they know the thrills and challenges of bringing a book into this world.

Since 2011, BookBaby has helped thousands realize their publishing goals by offering the largest eBook distribution network, including Amazon, Apple, Kobo, Barnes & Noble, and many other popular retailers in over 170 countries around the globe.

Learn more at www.BookBaby.com.


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Identifying your Audience: Don’t spin your wheels with those who aren’t interested in what you have to say

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When you start to write your book, it’s essential to know your audience and your market. Identifying your audience will help shape your book throughout the writing process and ensure better sales when it comes time to market and promote your nonfiction book. If you think your book is for everyone, you are setting yourself up for failure. No matter how great your message, it simply cannot appeal to every person! Just like in life, if you try to please everyone, you’ll end up stretching yourself too thin and the result will be a bland final product. When you identify your specific audience, you can reach the people who will be most interested in your story.

Who do you want to reach?

identifying your audienceYour book has a purpose. You wouldn’t be writing it if you didn’t want to reach someone, so exactly who is that? Many people make the mistake of thinking that their audience is just like them, but that’s not always the case. Your ideal audience may be very different from you, so take the time to think about who will be most impacted by your book. Are your readers women between 20 and 40? Can you narrow that down to women who have also been to college? It may seem counter-intuitive to narrow in on a specific group, but when you target a specific audience, you can increase your following within that niche group and reach more people than if your audience is too broad.

Pick a genre

Part of identifying your audience is selecting the correct genre. A genre is a general term that refers to a particular classification or type of book. We already know that your book will fall into the nonfiction genre, but where else does your book fit?

Remember, bookstores categorize books by genre, so the genre you choose is critically important. What section of the bookstore will your ideal reader go to in order to find the kind of help you offer? Make sure your book ends up on the right shelf — the one that best suits your ideal reader.

Identifying your audience and market, is there a difference?

Audiences and markets often overlap, but not always! Your audience is the people who will read and benefit from your book. Your market is the people who will actually purchase the book. Take a minute to picture your book buyers. Are they in your target market? For example, if your target reader is a child, your market is probably the parents, the people who have the money to spend on the book.

Identify secondary markets

Many books will have a primary and secondary market. Secondary markets are people/organizations/institutions who will also benefit from your book. Secondary markets may include mental health practitioners if you are writing about depression or a particularly difficult time in your life, or educators if you are writing about children. If you are writing about money management, high school and university counselors could be a secondary market because they might recommend the book to their students. If you are writing about blogging for business, parents of hopeful bloggers could easily become a secondary market. Think about every possibility! You should have several secondary markets, so be sure to analyze which people, organizations, or groups could benefit from your book.

Start with an audience, finish with a successful book

Keep your target audience in mind every step of the way. Write for your audience, identify your markets, and reach out to them with your solution!


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market my book

Can Conferences Help Me Market My Book?

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In order to be a successful author, you need to take writing seriously. Even if you are already a talented writer, you should always be looking to improve upon your craft. Plus, there is a lot more to being a published author than simply writing good books. Attending conferences can help you learn more about the process of marketing your book, while also helping you enrich your writing. So if you are still asking yourself, “how can I market my book?” it’s time to sign up for a conference or two!market my book

Publishing is an industry

If you want to be a published author, you have to be both a writer and a businessman/woman. Finishing your novel is a huge step, but it’s one step amongst many that you’ll have to take in order to become a successful author. Conferences can guide you through what to expect from the publishing process. You can learn valuable information such as average costs, timelines, and common mistakes to avoid. Industry professionals and successful authors can discuss the pros and cons of self-publishing versus traditional publishing, and help you get on the right path.

 

Can conferences really help me market my book?

Conferences allow you to surround yourself with like-minded people. The entire environment is designed to help you thrive. Conferences allow you to connect with other authors and, more importantly, connect with industry professionals. Experienced industry professionals have set aside time to work with aspiring authors and offer their expert advice. If you had a chance to have lunch with a successful published author and a popular publisher, wouldn’t you take it? Think of conferences as that lunch, just on a much larger scale. These authors and publishers actually want to talk to you and hear more than just your elevator pitch. Take advantage of the time that they have dedicated; ask questions, present ideas, and take advice from people who have been exactly where you are now.

 When you attend a conference,
you connect with people who can connect you
with people who can help you!

Talk to people at conferences that can help lay out your path to becoming a successful published author. Make sure you talk to as many people as you can. You will be surrounded by a wealth of knowledge, you never know when one connection could lead you to an incredibly valuable new connection in the future.

Learn more about marketing your book

Attending a conference can assist you in finding your target audience and get you brainstorming on how to attract that audience. You can sit in on a variety of talks by experienced presenters who will cover different marketing strategies. Find out if book reviews, public speaking engagements, agents, or a combination of any of those things are the right way to go when it comes to marketing your book.

Don’t miss out

Remember: no one in their right mind would pass up a chance to chat about their book with a publisher over coffee, so why would you miss out on a chance to be attend a conference full of industry professionals? Conferences are a unique environment, full of knowledge, experience, and people eager to discuss your ideas. Take advantage of these opportunities and learn how to market your book more effectively.


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book promotion promoting your book

Budget enough time and patience for your book promotion

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This article courtesy of BookBaby.

book promotion promoting your bookWhat are the most important elements of book promotion? Here’s my five-part answer!

It’s THE question. The one I’m always asked, whether I’m speaking at author conferences or doing webinars. It’s top of mind for all those would-be authors who are itching to give self publishing a try. Though phrased a little differently each time, it goes something like this:

What’s most important when it comes to book promotion?

My response is always the same – a five-part answer. The first four parts are, quite frankly, pretty predictable. The last one might come as a bit of a surprise.

Here are all of the must-haves:

  • You wrote your best book. Hopefully it’s a great book. But it’s your best effort and you can’t ask for anything more.
  • Your manuscript was edited by a professional. Not by your sister, the part-time English teacher. Your book deserves to be edited by a pro who has devoted her lifetime to the unique craft of book editing.
  • Your book cover is eye-catching and appropriate for you genre. It requires the talents of a graphic artist who specializes in book design. The fastest way to condemn a book to the bottom of the heap is to give it an amateur-looking cover.
  • Your book is being widely distributed. That means creating an eBook, print books and print-on-demand distribution. Maximum eyeballs, and that’s not just Amazon!

Like I said – it’s pretty much the standard stuff you read everywhere. And finally there’s this:

  • You’ve factored time into the equation. Publishing requires patience. Many of the mistakes a novice author makes revolve around time. Either they rush into the marketplace, or they give up too quickly.

Publishing experts like to say, “Publishing is a marathon and not a sprint.” I buy into that, but I like this better: “Good books don’t have an expiration date.” Authors need to realize that overnight sensations are rare. Patience and persistence are essential to a great book marketing plan for self-published authors.

Here are the five ways that you can put time on your side:

1. Publish when YOU are ready.
Of course that means taking the proper time to finish your best manuscript. But it also means you need to allow time for editing (3-6 weeks) and creating a great cover design (2-4 weeks). But there should be a limit to your patience when it comes to picking your publishing path.

First-time authors who want to be traditionally published  should expect 18 to 24 months to pass before their book is on the market. And that’s if they’re successful in finding both an agent and publisher – no sure thing. But if you choose to self publish, it takes only a fraction of that time, in some cases as few as six weeks. An easy choice, don’t you think?

2. Make pre-sales your priority.
A lot of authors miss out on the single most important marketing time period for their eBooks and print on demand books: Pre-sales periods on Amazon and Barnes &Noble. Pre-sales are when books are listed for sale in advance of the official release date. Customers can read sample teasers and place orders (and their credit cards aren’t charged until the release date!)

Pre-sales time frames have tons of benefits, but not all of them are apparent to first-time authors.

  • Collecting these pre-release sales can provide you a better chance of making the best seller lists on many retailers, including iBooks, B&N, and Kobo. (It does not influence Amazon charts).
  • Having a future release date means you can orchestrate the availability of your book, and use this launch date as a centerpiece of some marketing efforts.
  • Behind the scenes, pre-sales activity has a huge effect on your positioning on retailers such as Amazon. Their algorithms measure activity on your selling pages – the more page views, traffic, and sales during that period mean your eBook could come up higher in searches and other referral methods. With print on demand, Amazon will take a more aggressive inventory position based on strong customer activity.

3. Let me be the first to say it: Book Launch, Book Smaunch. It’s not all that.
This goes against a lot of popular book marketing thinking today. What’s the real value of a book launch? It really depends on who you are. If you are an established author with a built-in audience, a book launch can be a powerful selling starting point. But what about the typical self-published author searching for those alpha readers?

I understand that your book launches might be a nice personal milestone or accomplishment to commemorate that first book. Am I advising against having a book launch? Certainly not. But I advise you to put this opportunity to good use:

  • Use the opportunity to interact with your readers – even if only a few – as well as other authors. Get close to them – they can be a tremendous resource.
  • Measure each and every one of your marketing efforts surrounding the event. Try to learn what works and what doesn’t.
  • Don’t get stressed out if your launch doesn’t sell hundreds of books. I’ll tell you right now – it most likely won’t, but that doesn’t mean your book will fail. Don’t let this deter you from future efforts.

4. Take your time when marketing.
Lord knows there are no shortage of book marketing opportunities — getting reviews, going on “blog tours,” sending press releases, posting on all the social media platforms. And don’t forget spending time on Goodreads.

For most authors it can be completely overwhelming to do it all. So don’t. That’s my advice. Focus on one channel at a time. This month you can work on your Twitter campaign, follow the right people, add new followers. Then next month you can devote to Goodreads, and so on. If you buy into the concept of book publishing being a marathon, these short-term marketing targets are like the shorter legs of that long race.

5. When is it time to give up? Never!
A great, and very recent example of how persistence can pay off is the amazing story of The Rabbit Who Wants To Fall Asleep. Most folks have heard the story of the self-published book that suddenly shot up the New York Times Best Seller list in late August. Written by Swedish psychologist Carl-Johan Forssen Ehrlin, the book attracted the attention of all the major traditional publishers, resulting in a reported seven-figure contract for future titles.

And now for the rest of the story. Ehrlin originally published the book in 2013 (with BookBaby) as an eBook. He posted very modest sales from the launch all the way through 2014. This lack of early success didn’t slow his enthusiasm for the book, and he had it converted into five languages and gave away over 45,000 eBooks! Ehrlin called in to the BookBaby customer service team quite often for advice and encouragement. He completely believed in his project and never stopped promoting it.

Later, Ehrlin created a printed book version and added Print On Demand distribution, with modest sales through 2015. Suddenly last summer, his sales started to climb. All of those free eBooks had created tremendous word-of-mouth marketing. A few stories appeared in European newspapers, and the story soon spread across the globe of his unique parenting techniques.

The moral to this story: After three plus years of hard work and effort, this “overnight sensation” was really anything but. Ehrlin used his marketing time wisely and he’s now reaping the rewards.

In the words of French dramatist Jean Racine: “There are no secrets that time does not reveal.” The key to your best book promotional effort could be revealed tomorrow, next week, or maybe next month. Be patient and give your book every chance it deserves to succeed.

Image via ShutterStock.com.

 

About BookBaby

Based in the Philadelphia-area, BookBaby is a team of authors, poets, bloggers, and artists — so they know the thrills and challenges of bringing a book into this world.

Since 2011, BookBaby has helped thousands realize their publishing goals by offering the largest eBook distribution network, including Amazon, Apple, Kobo, Barnes & Noble, and many other popular retailers in over 170 countries around the globe.

Learn more at www.BookBaby.com.


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How to Attract an Audience for Your Book

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How to attract an audience for your bookAs a writer, you may enjoy the solitary pursuit of writing, but one thing’s for sure—when your book is finished you’ll want get it in the hands of readers. The best way to do that is to start now, even as you write your book, to attract your audience.

You may have heard the old adage that it takes seven touches to make a sale. In book marketing, that has held true. Your audience needs to hear what you’re about, to learn to respect you as you prove your expertise, and to become interested in you and enticed by what you have to say, well in advance of a purchase.

1. Define Your Audience

Before you can attract an audience, you need to know who they are. Of course, your readers are your audience, but who are they? Picture them as they walk in the bookstore. What do you see? Is it women between the ages of 30 and 50? Parents who want to instill values in their children? Business owners who are short of cash?

The key is to figure out who your audience is before you begin writing your nonfiction book because that’s the group you will influence, the group you will impact, and the group you will target when your book is complete.

2. Define Your Book’s Market

Isn’t your audience the same as your market? Not necessarily. Your market is the people/organizations/institutions that will purchase your book. For example, if you are writing a book for children, children are your audience, but they’re not your market. Your market is the person with the pocketbook – the parents.

Think about those people/organizations/institutions that might purchase your book, for example, educators if you’re writing about children, or mental health practitioners if you are writing about walking conquering depression. Try to identify at least six markets for your book – a primary market and five secondary markets. You’re going to use this information when you start reaching out to potential customers, so be thorough.

3. Classify Your Book

Part of knowing your audience is knowing where your book fits in relation to other books. In other words, what is it’s genre?

The term genre simply means a particular classification or type of book, and there are two main genres in writing: fiction and nonfiction. There are numerous sub-genres within each of these genres, and you need to know where your book fits. Why is this important? It’s important to you because you want to reach a certain audience, and people often select the books they read according to genre. That’s why bookstores divide their selections by genre—it makes it easier for people to find the books that appeal to them.

Think about your audience again. If they are looking for your book, what section will they browse in a bookstore? Assume they don’t know the book title or your name as the author. They simply want to find the information that your book delivers. Where are they going to look? Identify your book’s genre, and you will have some insight on how to reach your market.

This is the starting point for identifying your readers, but there’s more to it than simply identifying your genre. Your readers are buried within your target markets, and I want you to know how to scout them out.

4. Target Your Markets

With all the books being published, it’s more important that EVER to know your market and how to reach your audience.

So, go back to your ideal customer. They’re hard to find because they look like everyone else, so we have identify them according to what they need. And what is that? They need the SOLUTION that is found in your book. You may think, “I know who they are – generally – but I don’t know how to get to them specifically.”

Go back to your list you made of primary and secondary markets and create a detailed plan to reach them. Do this before your book is finished, so you’ll be ready to get your book in their hands when it’s published.


 

 

 

 


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How to Define an Audience for Your Book

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When it comes to book marketing, knowing your audience is essential. You need to figure out who your book is for—and there may be multiple audiences—but please know that your book is not for everyone. Not everyone will benefit from or even enjoy your book, so don’t try to appeal to the masses. Hone in on your intended audience and get your book on their radar.

So how do you define that audience of book readers?

how to define an audience for your book book writing classes online book coach

Do your research before writing your book.

All too many authors write their book without defining the target audience, and defining your audience is particularly important when writing nonfiction. And yet, if you narrow in on something too niche, you might discover that your audience is simply too small. For example, you might write a riveting book about how to maintain antique farm equipment, but will enough people be interested in that topic?  It’s possible, but you want to be confident that you have solid book marketing plans before you start to write. You must think about your target audience when planning your book, as well as throughout the writing process.

Here are some questions to ask yourself regarding your target audience:

  • How old are they?
  • What is their gender?
  • What’s their education level?
  • What concerns/problems do they have?
  • Do they live in one specific geographic area?
  • What shared interests will they have?

Self-published authors, especially those who write memoirs or biographies, may think that their target audience are people like themselves, when in reality, your audience may be quite different from you. It’s important to identify what your audience actually wants and needs, not what you think they do.

Book Audience vs. Market

For example, if you are writing a book for children, children are your audience, but they’re not your market. Your market is the person with the pocketbook – the parents.

Be specific when defining your primary market. Picture the person who will buy your book. Is it a woman between the ages of 30 and 50 who is unhappy with the signs of aging? A target audience of all women between the ages of 30 and 50 is too broad, so it’s important to consider what subset of that group you want to attract. Ask yourself what will draw them in. How do you hope to influence and/or interest these women?

It’s also important to consider secondary markets. Secondary markets are those are the people/organizations/institutions who will also purchase your book, like educators who might be writing or teaching about your topic, or mental health practitioners if you are writing about a mental health topic like depression. Think hard about all the different groups that might benefit from your book. Try to come up with at least six markets for your book – a primary market and five secondary markets. You’re going to use this information when you start reaching out to customers, so be thorough. 

What is the goal of your book?

It’s important to know what you hope to accomplish with your book. You should know what message you are trying to send, and whom that message is supposed to reach. Book marketing is about knowing who will benefit from your book, and then focusing your marketing efforts on that audience.

When it comes to marketing your book, choosing your target market and audience is essential to your book’s success. Consider all the possibilities to ensure that a proper audience and market exist for your book, and then create your plan to grab their attention.


Get the help you need to get your book published.

If you need help to write your book, consider one of my nonfiction book coaching programs:


author-coaching-book-coach-online-writing-class-get-my-book-outAbout Nonfiction Book Writing & Publishing Expert Nancy Erickson

Nancy Erickson is better known as “The Book Professor,” a writing and publishing consultant who specializes in helping aspiring nonfiction authors bring their book ideas to market. Nancy works as a book coach assisting authors that write self-help books, biographies, business books, and other nonfiction books through online courses and book coaching. Contact Nancy with questions or to have her speak at your upcoming event by clicking here.

 


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