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Fathers, We Need You, Too!

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Fathers, We Need You, Too!

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Last month the world paid tribute to all our mothers. On Sunday, June 18th, we celebrate the dads on Father’s Day. In mainstream media, it seems that you only hear about the deadbeat dads who don’t step up to the plate. You know the type: consistently unemployed, emotionally unavailable, and completely un-involved with the little ones they helped to create.

I’m a mother of two daughters and was fortunate that they had a very involved father, and it makes me angry when I hear about men who’ve simply chosen to optfather figure-out. With the statistics of “single-mothers” now at an all-time high, it’s no wonder we think that some men have abandoned the home.

But, what about the men who do step up to their responsibility as a father figure? We don’t hear enough about them, and sometimes it seems that the father’s role is often minimized when compared to the mother’s. This isn’t true. If you don’t think dads have a critical role in the development of their children, think again.

Studies have shown that children who grow up without a strong father figure have:

  • A diminished self-concept and compromised physical and emotional security. Children consistently report feeling abandoned when their fathers are not involved in their lives, they struggle with their emotions and have episodic bouts of self-loathing.
  • Behavioral problems. Fatherless children have more difficulties with social adjustment, and are more likely to report problems with friendships, and manifest behavior problems.
  • Truancy and poor academic performance. Seventy-one percent percent of high school dropouts are fatherless.
  • Delinquency and youth crime, including violent crime. Eighty-five percent of youth in prison have an absent father, and fatherless children are more likely to offend and go to jail as adults.
  • Promiscuity and teen pregnancy. Fatherless children are more likely to experience problems with sexual health, including a greater likelihood of having intercourse before the age of 16, becoming teenage parents, and contracting sexually transmitted infection.

Source

These statistics keep going. When you look at the problems around our country, you can’t help but wonder how many of them would be solved if more children grew up with a father figure. Remember, not EVERY child that grows up without a father will experience these side effects, but many, unfortunately, do. Dads, if you didn’t think you were important to your child’s life, I hope this changes your mind. If you have a solution to the problem of fatherless children in our country, join us as we find 117 solutions in 2017!

The Good Guys

Fatherless children are a big problem in our country, so I want to pay tribute to some of the people who have chosen to be part of the solution, such as organizations like The National Center for Fathering, which was created in 1990 in response to the social and economic impact of fatherlessness in America. Their dedicated team of professionals wholeheartedly believe every child needs a dad they can count on.
The research is clear: children thrive when they have an involved father or father figure—someone who loves them, knows them, guides them, and helps them achieve their destiny. The National Center for Fathering works to improve the lives of children and reverse the trends of fatherlessness by inspiring and equipping fathers, grandfathers and father figures to be actively engaged in the life of every child. Source

For more information about this organization or how to become involved, please visit them at www.fathers.com


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What Type of People Do We Work With?

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I’m often asked when I meet aspiring writers: what type of people do you work with? This is an easy question for me. At the risk of being labeled an idealist, I sincerely believe that all of our problems—and I mean all of them—can be solved, and that the answers are trapped inside of everyday people like you. When you share what you know and what you’ve learned, you become the solution. At The Book Professor, we help aspiring authors write non-fiction books that will change lives, save lives, and transform society. Whether you’re a business leader, an overcomer, a public speaker, or you want to write your personal memoir, we know exactly what you need to do to write your book. Join us over the next couple of months as we highlight the clients my team and I serve every day.

The Business Leader

You’ve been a professional and a leader for quite some time and have learned a few things along the way, haven’t you? Your years of experience, education, ideas, and expertise are what other impassioned leaders need in order to gain the success that you’ve achieved. Perhaps you’ve already been a mentor to others, and you know that what you know could benefit more than you can reach in person. If you want a greater influence, you need a bigger platform! It’s time to take your solution and help others solve the problems they can’t fix on their own.

Why Should a Business Leader Write a Book?business leader

As a business leader with years of experience, you know deep down that you’re a true leader. Writing a book helps to establish yourself as an expert with those who don’t know your talent.

Business leaders write a book for a number of reasons:

  1. You have something to share that will benefit others.
  2. You want to leave a legacy that will impact the future.
  3. You see others struggle and have learned how to overcome obstacles.
  4. You want to showcase your business and the path to success.

Listen to what our writer, David J.P. Fisher, author, business leader, and entrepreneur had to say after he wrote his first book Networking in the 21st Century: Why Your Network Sucks and What to Do About It:

“Writing the first book was definitely a big hurdle, but I found that it was like running a marathon. Once you do one, you look back and want to do it again. I’ve published three shorter books in the ten months after publishing my first book, and there are more on the way. It’s definitely helped build my professional credibility and stature as an expert in my field.”

What do you have to lose? When will there ever be a better moment than now? It’s time to build your personal brand and establish yourself as the expert you are.

If you’re a business leader that has always wanted to write a book, reach out to us, and we can help you take the next step!

 

 

 

 

 

 


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Lessons Learned-Let’s Get Physical

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May is National Bike Month, so I’d like to talk about lessons learned from physical fitness. We all know the benefits of physical exercise, but if you’re anything like me, I have a love-hate relationship with it. Of course, I love its advantages: weight control, reduced risk of certain diseases, muscle endurance and, of course, mental clarity. But do I feel like working out every day? Not so much.

I remember when my husband and I took a trip to the Grand Canyon. He loves the outdoors. To survive the 8.5-mile hike down Bright Angel Trail while carrying our belongings, I knew I needed to get a trainer. I was in reasonably good shape but not strong enough to make the hike while carrying my 25 pound pack. So I started training with Brent about five months before our trip.

He planned a regimen where on Wednesdays we worked on building strength and on Fridays we worked on balance and agility. When Brent told me to do twenty jump squats, I did them. When he told me to get on the stair climber and climb on my tiptoes, I did it. No two sessions were the same, and week after week after week, I showed up and did whatever he said to do for that hour. Little by little, I built my strength and agility in those one-hour bite-sized chunks.

It paid off.

The day we hiked down the Grand Canyon, it took us 5.5 hours to get to the bottom, and I felt pretty good until about the last half mile. The heat was exhausting, and by the time we reached the bottom it was 109 degrees, but we made it. I made it! Those small repeated increments of time I’d devoted to getting in shape for the trip carried me from the upper rim of the Grand Canyon to the Colorado River at the bottom.

It’s funny. Physical exercise is what life is like. We don’t always feel like doing things in life. If we only did what we felt every day, there would be a lot of unsolved problemsnational bike month because people would give up the first time they failed. After all, who ever feels like trying again after failure? And do you know how many inventions were the result of countless initial failures? Almost all of them. There would be a lot of failed relationships because people would bail at the first sign of discomfort. And there would be a lot of diseases with no cure today because the scientist didn’t feel like facing another failed experiment.

But isn’t that what greatness is about? It’s often in our failure that we learn our best lessons and come up with the greatest solutions. Solutions that result from failure and struggle are what make non-fiction books so compelling. Why? Because we can relate to it. Anybody that’s successful in their chosen field is only a success because they did what others didn’t feel like doing. Isn’t that why Nike’s slogan: “Just Do It” is so popular? Whatever your physical fitness or life goals are, “Just Do It.”

May is National Bike Month

Need a little change up from your typical physical fitness routine? Get on your bike and get moving. National Bike Month was established in 1956 by the League of American Bicyclists to celebrate the benefits of cycling and encourage others to start pedaling. For more on this organization or about cycling in general, please check them out at http://bikeleague.org/bikemonth.

 

 


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Writing Tips: Pacing

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PACING in literature refers to the rate at which your story progresses. Your job as a nonfiction writer is to move the story along without losing your audience. It’s important not to go too fast, and you certainly don’t want to go so slow that you bore them to death. When you understand how to control the pace of your story, you’ve grasped one of the most important skills in writing.  Keep the following in mind when you write, and you’ll be a master at story pacing in no time.

story pacing1. Length controls speed.

Short scenes and chapters, terse sentences, and snappy dialogue all contribute to a feeling of intensity and speed. This is probably the easiest way to control your pacing. As your story nears the tense scenes, make it a point to condense everything. Limit the length of your scenes to 500-800 words, cut your scenes short at important moments, and switch back and forth between points of view.

Fragments, sparse sentences, and short paragraphs quicken the pace. Crisp, punchy verbs, especially those with onomatopoeia (crash, lunge, sweep, scatter, ram, scavenge) also add to a quick pace. Invest in suggestive verbs to enliven descriptions, build action scenes, and milk the suspense.

Harsh consonant sounds such as those in words like claws, crash, kill, quake, and nag can push the reader ahead. Words with unpleasant associations can also ratchet up the speed: hiss, grunt, slither, smarmy, venomous, slaver, and wince. Energetic, active language is especially appropriate for building action scenes and suspense and for setting up drama and conflict.

A fast pace means you trim every sentence of unnecessary words. Eliminate prepositional phrases where you don’t need them: For example, “the walls of the cathedral” can be written as “the cathedral walls.” Finally, search your story for passive linking verbs and trade them in for active ones.

2. Vary Story Pacing

As important as the high-tension race-‘em-chase-‘em scenes are, it’s even more important to vary your pacing with slow, introspective scenes. Without the slow scenes, your characters and your readers won’t have a chance to catch their breaths. Even the most exciting scenes lose their intensity if they aren’t balanced with moments of deliberate quiet.

3. Pay Attention to Details to Build Momentum

In film, directors often show scenes in slow motion to indicate that something dramatic is happening or about to happen. One of the best ways writers can mimic this technique is to slow their own writing down by piling on the details. Let’s say one of your characters is shot. This is an important moment in the story, and you want the readers to feel its impact. You can do this when you take your time and describe every detail: the look on the gunman’s face as he fires, the recoil of the pistol, the flash of the barrel, the horror that chokes the victim, and finally the collision of the bullet.

4. Control Your Tell vs. Show Ratio

Although “showing” your audience the blow-by-blow details is key to engage the reader and make them feel the tension, sometimes the best way to hurtle them through a scene is to condense certain actions into “telling.” Perhaps you want to use that scene where your character is shot, but you don’t want to linger on it. You want to do a quick flyby, shock your readers, and plunge them into the action after the gunshot. Instead of taking the time to show the details, you can thrust the gunshot upon the reader simply by telling him/her that it happened.

5. Manipulate Sentence Structure

The mark of a professional writer is his ability to control the ebb and flow of his sentence structure. The most subtle way to influence your story pacing is through your sentence structure. The length of words, clauses, sentences, and paragraphs all contribute to the pacing.

Long=slow

Short=fast

When it’s time to write the intense scenes, cut back on the beautiful, long-winded passages and give it to your reader straight. Short sentences and snappy nouns and verbs convey urgency, whereas long, measured sentences offer moments of introspection and build-up.

To write like a professional, you must master the art of story pacing. This is critical to the success of your book. Once you perfect this writing technique, you will leave your readers eager for more. It takes practice, but the payoff is worth it in the end.

 


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When Do You Know Your Book Is Done?

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This article originally appeared on BookBaby.com

Most authors probably wish they had a gauge of some kind to stick into the pages to tell them when their book is done. It’s not just new, inexperienced writers who have that wish. Most published authors I’ve posed the question to say the same thing: it’s hard to know when to put down the virtual pen.

This post was edited and adapted from The End. Now What?! 6 Steps To Take Your Manuscript To Marketplace In 6 Weeks.

Finishing a book is just like you took a child out in the back yard and shot it.

—Truman Capote

Now that’s what I call starting your writing journey off with a bang! But Capote was only expressing the thoughts of many authors who feel a sense of tangible loss when their book is done. The prospect of this sudden void in their lives has led to far too many books being “overcooked.”

I’ve used that metaphor deliberately to help illustrate my point. When I venture into the kitchen to create something for the family, my kids often laugh at the slavish way I follow each and every line on the recipe. Most importantly, I pay close attention to the instructions that tell you when the food is actually “done.”

Want that steak medium rare? I’ve got a little thermometer gauge that tells me when it’s reached 155 degrees. Are the brownies done yet? Stick a toothpick in. If it comes out clean – they’re ready.

Most authors probably wish they had a gauge of some kind to stick into the pages to tell them when their book is done. It’s not just new, inexperienced writers who have that wish. Most published authors I’ve posed the question to say the same thing: it’s hard to know when to put down the virtual pen. It’s human nature to want to constantly improve and tinker with your work. Most authors say if allowed to pick up their work again six months after finishing, they’ll find more than a few things to change beyond some simple typo fixes.

Some signs pointing to the finish line

We’re trying to get your book in shape for the editing it richly deserves – and frankly needs. This post isn’t about fixing those typos or repairing sentence structure. It’s about making sure your book is telling the story you want told, in the way you want it told, and in a way that can make sense to thousands of potential readers. For that to happen, you as the author need to be ready to put down the pen. Here are some toothpicks and thermometers to help you gauge the doneness of your book.

From red to white

One BookBaby author I interviewed uses color to illustrate the progress of his books. After what he calls his “last draft,” he prints out the pages and does some serious self-editing. He uses a bright red sharpie and lays into the pages. After a first ruthless edit, he says the pages look like they’re hemorrhaging, a sea of red. A draft later it’s just a few red slashes. Finally, he says, he’s looking at pages with only the occasional slashes of red. He says to see the progress before his eyes is a satisfying way to know that the book is finally turning into the story he intended to tell.

So obvious. So boring! Authors tell me how sick they get of their precious book. They get to a point where they know more about the plot and story line of their fictional characters than real life family and colleagues. Of course you should – these are the people you’ve been living with for the past weeks and months. Long ago when you embarked on this book project, you thought your plot was marvelous. It still is! You have the curse of knowing where the story leads and ends.

The truth is, the jokes in your story ARE hilarious, as good as the first time you typed them. The plot IS spellbinding; the twists and turns are sure to please. The information I’m relaying here IS solid, professional self-publishing advice. We writers are just bored, which is a sure sign that it’s time to move on.

Change for change’s sake

Look at the last few edits you’ve made to your book. Did you improve it, or did you just change it? You’re not adding value to your book at this point. You’re not making it more interesting or richer or even more readable. You’re delaying the inevitable. There comes a point when the longer you revise, the less return you’re going to get for your effort. You’ve reached a point of diminishing return.

A new story

Every writer has ideas for that next book, or more likely books. Maybe there have been big changes in your life and you’re not in the same emotional place as you were when you started writing. Whatever the reason, your enthusiasm for this current project may be waning. For you to simply say, “I don’t feel like writing this story anymore” is an important sign you can’t ignore. When you lose interest in the book, you’ll stop caring. Your reader will know – who hasn’t read a book where it felt like the writer just lost interest in the project and wrapped it up in an all too fast and unsatisfying manner?

You’re about to enter into a new relationship – actually multiple relationships – with your readers. The reader has entered into the relationship with optimism and interest in your prose. You’re obligated to honor your commitment to entertaining, informing, and delighting your new BFFs. They’re very excited about reading your book. If you aren’t as excited about adding any more to the story, it’s a sure sign that you’re actually damaging your book rather than enhancing it.

Put your book to the test

It’s always good to get some second and third opinions on your book, just as long as they’re not people you spend the holidays with. You should pretty much ignore the comments and less-than-critical critiques from your close friends and family. Beware the praises or critiques of your great-aunt Edna. Few friends or family members can honestly offer you objective feedback. If they CAN, count yourself lucky and listen to what they have to say.

In most cases, you’d be better off joining a local writers group. The authors in these groups can provide tremendous feedback, inspire new ideas, and give great moral support. Writing is often a very solitary pursuit and these groups can be your lifeline at times. Digest their commentary, be surprised at their insights and your blind spots, dust yourself off, and revise if necessary.

Read your book like it’s brand new

You’ve spent hundreds of hours looking bleary-eyed at the characters on a screen. Take it offline for another look. Find yourself a bright highlighter and sit down to read it through as though you’re a reader. Whenever you find an awkward phrase or a sentence – or whenever you want to change or fix something – make a mark and move on. Do not stop to do an edit. Once you get to the end you can go back to your file, start at the last page and work backward, making changes and corrections.

Print a second hard copy, but this time change the font to something visually quite different. If you work in Times New Roman, try printing in Calibri. You’ll see it looks very different and you may be surprised by how many new typos and errors you manage to catch.

Last comes first

On the next run-through, read your manuscript backwards – not word for word, but a chapter at a time. Read the last chapter, then the next to last, and so on until you reach the first. This serves to take things out of context for you and you won’t be as likely to skim over what you expect to be there. It might feel uncomfortable, but it works.

Read it. Write it. Speak it.

When my kids were slogging through high school, I used to tell them, “The best way to master a subject is to learn by the power of three. Read the material, write notes, then speak it out loud.” So get some throat lozenges and find a quiet room. Reading your book aloud can help you “see” it fresh and let you more easily identify awkward phrases or sentences.

Be the reader

The last trick of the trade I’ll share with you is courtesy of Dani Shapiro, the critically acclaimed author of Slow Motion and Devotion. She has also written for magazines such as The New Yorker; O, The Oprah Magazine; Vogue; and ELLE. Shapiro helped put things into context during her keynote address at a recent Writer’s Digest Conference as she described the simple process of sending an email. When you’re composing the note, the words and thoughts express a certain position or point of view. Everything looks right and so you hit “Send.”

As the electrons fly through the ether, you see it: that obvious typo. The one you looked right past 10 times as the author. But what really happened is that the minute you hit the send button you read the message as a completely different person: the recipient.

This is the approach she takes when taking that last critical examination of her book. She actually reads the book as if she’s someone else. She’ll read chapters as if she’s a kindly caring person on one day. On another she reads it as an angry critical person. From the readings of these and other personas, Shapiro is satisfied that her diverse audience is ready to read her next book.

Time’s up. Pens down. You’ve got a deadline.

Maybe the best test of all that your book is done has nothing to do with the words on the page. Maybe it’s the ticking of a clock. As I sit here typing this on a Sunday morning, I’ve put myself into a self-imposed deadline to have this finished by tonight. Time’s up. Got to bake some brownies.

Download your FREE copy of The End. Now What?! 6 Steps To Take Your Manuscript To Marketplace In 6 Weeks today.

book is done

 

About BookBaby

Based in the Philadelphia-area, BookBaby is a team of authors, poets, bloggers, and artists — so they know the thrills and challenges of bringing a book into this world.

Since 2011, BookBaby has helped thousands realize their publishing goals by offering the largest eBook distribution network, including Amazon, Apple, Kobo, Barnes & Noble, and many other popular retailers in over 170 countries around the globe.

Learn more at www.BookBaby.com.


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Author Feature: Terry Lammers: Helping Business Owners Through Acquisition and Exit Strategy Planning

As a business owner, you’re constantly looking for ways to increase sales and profitability. But what happens when you’re ready to end things? Do you have an exit strategy in place for when it’s time to move on? Or what if business is booming, and you want to buy another company to expand yours? Do you know what to do? Most people don’t, and they can end up in financial ruin. But with the right guidance and insight, you can do it.

Read More

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Teacher Appreciation Week May 8-May 12th: “Teachers Deliver”

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Teacher Appreciation week is very important to me. As a professional book coach, writer, and former collegiate professor, I will forever be grateful to the teachers who ignited my love for all things “books.” I’ve always had an interest in reading and excelled in writing as a youngster, but it was my teachers who kept me motivated to pursue my dreams. They were always there to offer a kind word of encouragement when I felt discouraged. I believe there isn’t enough appreciation in our world for teachers. You usually only hear about the bad ones when there are millions of terrific teachers who do what they do, simply because they care. Teachers are often underpaid, criticized, and unappreciated for the job they do: to help shape and guide today’s youth. That, in my opinion, deserves more than a simple “thanks.”

teacher appreciation

I believe that our problems—all of them—can be solved, and that the answers are trapped inside of everyday people like you. If we didn’t have teachers to educate, inspire, lead, and cultivate the natural gifts that each person has, think about all the problems that would’ve gone unsolved.

Take a look at what some of these leaders have to say about their former teachers:

“My high school band director, Virgil Spurlin, had a huge impact on my life. Not because he was a particularly great band director. He was quite good, but he was a world-class human being. He took a personal interest in kids, and seemed to instinctively know when they were having trouble at home or having trouble in school, and always to know what to say to them and more importantly maybe what questions to ask to find out what was really going on in their lives. He also was always looking for things that young people could do besides play music. We put on the state band festival every year, for example, and he let lots of us help. And he taught us basic organizational skills and how to allocate resources and move things around. But always he was trying to find things that people were good at. He thought that everybody was good at something and if he just looked hard enough he could find it, he could convince them of it, and he could raise their aspirations and their hopes. He was unbelievable. All my life I thought of him. I stayed in touch with him on and off until he passed away. I really felt that my early years with him convinced me that I could organize and run things. That I could do whatever I wanted to do and that I could actually marshal other people in a common effort, and of course if you’re in politics that’s very important.”                  

-Bill Clinton

“There’s no way there would have been a Microsoft without what they did.”

-Bill Gates

“I credit my education to Ms. Mabel Hefty just as much as I would any institution of higher learning. She taught me that I had something to say — not in spite of my differences, but because of them. She made every single student in that class feel special.”

-Barack Obama

“I doubt I will ever meet another person who had the impact on my life that my English teacher at Episcopal High School did. All children should have a teacher like I had, who they remember when they have children and grandchildren as one of the most fortunate relationships in their lives.”

-Senator John McCain

Ways to Get Involved for Teacher Appreciation Week

The theme for this year’s Teacher Appreciation Week is “Teachers Deliver.” There are countless ways you can get involved this week and show your support for the teachers who have impacted your life. You don’t have to do anything fancy. A simple letter, email, or phone call to the teacher(s) that helped shape the person you are today would be great. Social media is also a great way to get involved. Check out this Promotional Event Toolkit from the National PTA for other ways to celebrate the teachers in your life.

What about you? Do you have a story to tell that can save lives, change lives, or transform society? When you share what you know and what you’ve learned, you become the solution. The answers are inside of you.

If you or someone you know has always wanted to write a book, reach out to us, and we can help make it happen!

 


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Lessons Learned – A Reflection on Fear

There are lessons to be learned from fear. It may be a natural response to many situations, but all too often fear is unwarranted and prevents us from moving forward in life. What has fear taken from you? What fears haunt you?

Failure of our education system. Sex Trafficking. Hate Crimes. Racial Profiling. Child Pornography. Teen heroin use and overdose. Social media bullying. I can keep the list going, but when I read these problems, it sends chills up my spine. What about you? When you hear about the news, all the issues that surround us, and the people affected by them, are you angry? Underneath that anger is there a ball of fear because you worry that these problems could impact you, your children, and the people you love?

You’re not alone.

Fear, while a natural emotion and response to things that have the potential to threaten or cause harm, can also fearmake us irrational if we allow it to control us. I’m not talking about the fear that comes if you’re on a morning jog and find yourself squared off with a pack of growling pit bulls. Anybody would probably be terrified by that.

But what about the fears we have as parents? I’m a mother of two adult children. The world that I raised my daughters in looks very different than the world we live in today. Yes, I had many fears while raising them, but I can’t say that I was worried about them being bullied online or overdosing on heroin. That doesn’t mean I didn’t have fears like any parent does. But in order for me to be an effective parent, one who didn’t stifle development or become an angry person, I had to learn to feel my feelings and let the fear go–especially fear of the unknown–and trust that things were working as they should.

False Evidence Appearing Real

Many of my clients started by telling me that they “just weren’t ready at this time.” Almost all of their concerns were centered around fear. To put it frankly, fear stinks. It robs us of so much. It robs us of opportunities because we’re too afraid to fail, of relationships because we don’t want to get hurt, and it robs us of our destiny because we’re afraid of change. Yes, it’s an emotion and at times is a natural response to a circumstance, but we have to choose whether or not we allow it to dictate and limit our life. Fear of rejection (my book won’t be a success and people won’t read it), fear of failure (I don’t want to write a book and mess up), and fear of the unknown (how the heck am I going to write my book?) are all real fears that my writers had in the beginning.

 

What is fear?

 

FALSE

EVIDENCE

APPEARING

REAL

 

What if your fear is based on an something that hasn’t happened and may not ever happen to you? Would that change how you respond to life’s daily challenges and the nightly news? Years ago someone shared that acronym with me, and it totally changed my perspective. I hope it changes yours.

 


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How Print On Demand Works [Infographic]

This article originally appeared on BookBaby.com

In “Print On Demand: The biggest advance in publishing since Gutenberg,” we detailed the benefits of print on demand books for the independent author, and how digital printing hasn’t just leveled the playing field, but changed the nature of the game. It is now cost-effective to print books as needed, not relying on offset printers to churn out thousands of books to justify the fixed costs. We also pitch the value of BookBaby’s BookShop program, where independent authors are paid a 50 percent royalty for all printed book sales, the latest boon to our Print On Demand offering.

Now our designers have made this fun infographic that walks you through the seven steps of how Print On Demand works.

print on demandRead more on the BookBaby Blog about Print On Demand:

Print On Demand: Your Timeline To Maximize Book Sales
We have an unofficial mission statement around the BookBaby offices: “We make the little guy (or gal!) look big.” What does that mean? It’s really quite simple. We help our self-published authors from around the world create and publish a book that looks every bit as good as those produced by big-time authors from the large publishing houses.

Print On Demand: All You Need To Know About Book Pre-Sales
Every online book retailer has its own schedule and process for handling the ingestion of new books. Some are on a weekly schedule; others are on a monthly routine. Because this involves the shipment of a physical book, there is a lot of prep work involved for each store to set up an inventory number in its own store catalog database. As your book enters into the various systems, your listing will start appearing on retail websites around the globe. This is usually two to three weeks after you have finalized your files. Now starts your critical pre-sales period.

How To Use 100 Print Books To Promote Your Self-published Book [Infographic]
You’ve finished your novel, you’re ready to self publish, and you’re considering print books for promotion and giveaways. How many should you print? Make it an even 100 to start with!

BookShop and Your Print On Demand Success
BookBaby has expanded its POD program to better serve indie authors. In sum, our new program: pays authors more – 50% of their list price; pays authors fast – in just a few days; promises in-stock status 24/7/365

 

About BookBaby

Based in the Philadelphia-area, BookBaby is a team of authors, poets, bloggers, and artists — so they know the thrills and challenges of bringing a book into this world.

Since 2011, BookBaby has helped thousands realize their publishing goals by offering the largest eBook distribution network, including Amazon, Apple, Kobo, Barnes & Noble, and many other popular retailers in over 170 countries around the globe.

Learn more at www.BookBaby.com.


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Author Feature: Nancy Nelson – Helping Women Through Crisis and Grief

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Crisis. We don’t know why or how it will happen, but if you’ve lived long enough, it’s not a matter of if it will happen to you, but when. Now, we don’t mean to be the bearer of bad news or come across as negative. If anything, we believe that people can only survive with hope and help. But many of us here are also old enough to know that life isn’t always a fairytale and crises do happen to everyday people. Webster defines a crisis as: “an unstable or crucial time or state of affairs in which a decisive change is impending-especially one with the distinct possibility of a highly undesirable outcome.” (Source)

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Everyday People Solve Extraordinary Problems Everyday

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The month of April gives us the opportunity to reflect on the many organizations that are currently finding solutions to some of our world’s biggest problems. From World Autism Awareness day to Cancer Control Month, everyday people just like you have made it their mission to not only focus on finding solutions to these problems but to make sure our world is aware of these issues. I believe that our problems—all of them—can be solved and that the answers are trapped inside people like you. When you share what you know and what you’ve learned, you become the solution. Join us this month as we pay tribute to these noteworthy causes.

finding solutions

World Autism Awareness Day

On December 18, 2007, the United Nations General Assembly declared April 2nd as World Autism Awareness Day. World Autism Awareness Day, or WAAD, is one of only four official health-specific United Nations Days, and it focuses on drawing attention to autism, a disorder that affects tens of millions of people worldwide. A new government study of parents suggests that 1 in 45 children ages 3-17 have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder.

Not only is there no cure for autism, but there is still much debate as to what causes it. The prevalence and high rate of autism in our world should concern everyone. WAAD activities help to increase world knowledge about children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and they celebrate the talents and skills of those living with it.  For more information on Autism or how to become involved in a local event near you, visit Autism Speaks at www.autismspeaks.org. (Source)

Easter

Whether you celebrate this day by dying eggs with the little ones or watching the kiddos hunt for them in an Easter egg hunt, Easter is one of our world’s most beloved holidays.

But for many, Sunday, April 16th is not just about dying eggs or the Easter Bunny. Easter Sunday, also known as Resurrection Sunday for many Christians, is a celebration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. For many Christians,  this is the most important holiday of the Christian faith and is paramount to the Christian religion.

Earth Day-Saturday April 22nd

Did you know that the average American produces 1,600 POUNDS of garbage a year and uses between 80 and 100 gallons of water a DAY? Or what about the fact that the electricity used by appliances plugged in, but not in use, accounts for 1% of global C02 emissions? (Source) Yikes! That’s a lot of water and garbage! It’s facts like these that make me more conscious of the carbon footprint I’m leaving behind. And fortunately, we have organizations like The Earth Day Network to bring more attention to this crucial issue. This year, Earth Day is focused on environmental and climate change literacy. Even with all the attention that climate change has gotten, many people are still unaware of what that actually means and the threat it causes to our planet. For more information about Earth Day Network or how to participate in an Earth Day event near you, please visit www.earthday.org.

Alcohol Awareness Month

I can’t tell you how many people I know that battle the disease of alcoholism in quiet. Out of fear of being rejected by family and friends, they hide their addiction. Sometimes they find recovery and other times they don’t. Because of their struggle, I am so glad that organizations like the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence or NCADD designated April as Alcohol Awareness Month.

This awareness month was established in 1987 to reduce the stigma associated with alcoholism by encouraging communities to reach out to the American public each April with information about alcohol, alcoholism, and recovery. Alcoholism is a progressive disease, genetically predisposed, and is fatal if untreated (Source)

There is hope and help for those living with alcoholism. The people that run NCADD are everyday people who are committed to finding solutions in recovery. To learn more about addiction or to get help for yourself and/or a loved one, visit https://www.ncadd.org/.

Cancer Control Month

Cancer. It crosses religions, race, age, social class and there isn’t a person on this planet that doesn’t know someone that’s been affected by it. It’s the second leading cause of death in the United States and the pain endured by those that have battled this disease as well as those that love them keeps us fighting for a cure.  And in 2017, there will be an estimated 1,688,780 new cancer cases diagnosed and 600,920 cancer deaths in the US alone (Source). I can’t tell you how many friends, loved ones, and associates I know that have had cancer wreak havoc on their life. This disease must be stopped.

The month of April is Cancer Control Month. In 1938, Congress passed a joint resolution requesting the President to issue an annual proclamation declaring April to be Cancer Control Month. And recently, President Donald Trump continued that proclamation. Let’s honor the memory of our loved ones that we’ve lost, and celebrate the survivors still here with us. Participate in your favorite cancer organization this month and help find a cure!

117 in 2017

I get excited when I learn about organizations such as the ones listed above that are out there finding solutions to some of our world’s biggest problems. Everyday people can and do solve extraordinary problems! This year, we too are looking for solutions to some of our worlds problems. How do we solve gun violence or tort reform?  How about you? What do you know, what have you been through, what have you discovered or developed that can help others? What inspirational nonfiction book could you write that will bring hope to others? Please join us in our effort to find 117 Solutions in 2017!

 


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developmental disabilities dignity

Dignity of All People-Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month

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In 1987, President Ronald Reagan declared March as Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month. Because holidays like St. Patrick’s Day are also in March, the awareness about people with disabilities can get overlooked. This month, we want to take a moment to reflect on its importance and highlight the dignity of all people.

The 70s and 80s paved the way for social change for those living with disabilities. With the support of President Reagan, “programs to provide career planning, job coaching, and employment for those living with disabilities began to increase. The idea that individuals with developmental disabilities could become productive members of the workforce was new to many people, and entrenched preconceptions had to be overcome.” (Source)

According to the Developmental Disabilities Act, the term developmental disability means a severe or chronic disability that happens before age 22 that is likely to continue and affects three or more of the following areas: self-care, receptive and expressive language, learning mobility, self-direction, capacity for independent living and economic self-sufficiency. Many of us are unaware of the challenges that those with special needs endure on a daily basis. While I have never raised children with special needs, I have friends who have. I will never know the challenges they face, but their strength, courage, and perseverance to endure and advocate for their child is commendable. I admire them greatly.

Developmental Disabilities Recommended Reading

Reading is a great way to get a look at something that you might not have experienced firsthand. Books, both fiction and nonfiction, can help you get closer to the issue. The Memory Keeper’s Daughter by Kim Edwards is an incredibly moving story in which a man decides to send his newborn daughter, who suffers from Down Syndrome, away to an institution. The nurse tasked with taking the baby to the institution decides to raise the baby herself, and the novel takes you along for that journey. Another great read is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime by Mark Haddon, a novel that centers around the detective adventures of a boy with an unnamed condition but that has indicators for developmental disabilities such as Asperger syndrome, high functioning Autism, or possibly Savant syndrome. Mark Haddon later noted in a blog that “”Curious Incident is not a book about Asperger’s….if anything it’s a novel about difference, about being an outsider, about seeing the world in a surprising and revealing way. The book is not specifically about any specific disorder” (Source). That, in itself, is a beautiful sentiment, as it focuses the book on the story, not simply a disability.

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer is also told through the eyes of a boy with Aspberger’s syndrome who is navigating an emotional and confusing time after his father died in the September 11th terrorist attacks. This book would bridge nicely into our 117 Solutions in 2017 theme for next week: stories from survivors of terrorism.

Dignity of All People

Every person deserves respect. Every life is precious and has purpose and value. I am reminded of this quote from Pope Francis:

“Things have a price and can be for sale, but people have a dignity that is priceless and worth far more than things.”

I hope you can spend some time reflecting on the challenges that those living with disabilities face. Our country has come a long way in supporting them, but there is still so much more work to do. If you or someone you know has a solution to the challenges that those who live with disabilities face, please don’t be silent. Your story could be the hope and help that someone needs. Join us to find 117 Solutions in 2017.


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